Item 0009 - Letter, Ottawa, to E.J. Moore, Toronto.

Title and statement of responsibility area

Title proper

Letter, Ottawa, to E.J. Moore, Toronto.

General material designation

Parallel title

Other title information

Title statements of responsibility

Title notes

Level of description

Item

Reference code

CA ON00239 F01383-S01-f0002-0009

Edition area

Edition statement

Edition statement of responsibility

Class of material specific details area

Statement of scale (cartographic)

Statement of projection (cartographic)

Statement of coordinates (cartographic)

Statement of scale (architectural)

Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Dates of creation area

Date(s)

  • 11 Dec. 1922 (Creation)
    Creator
    Stead, Robert James Campbell
  • 1922 (Receipt)
    Recipient
    E.J. Moore

Physical description area

Physical description

Item extent to be completed at a later date

Publisher's series area

Title proper of publisher's series

Parallel titles of publisher's series

Other title information of publisher's series

Statement of responsibility relating to publisher's series

Numbering within publisher's series

Note on publisher's series

Archival description area

Name of creator

(4 Sep. 1880-26 Jun. 1959)

Biographical history

Robert James Campbell Stead, writer, civil servant (b at Middleville, Ont 4 Sept 1880; d at Ottawa 26 June 1959). Raised in Manitoba, Stead began his writing career as a journalist and poet but he is best known for his novels. In his early poetry, such as The Empire Builders and Other Poems (1908), Stead mixed with styles of Service and Kipling to produce a virulently nationalist concept of Canada and Canadians. This strain was continued when he turned to novels in 1914, and wartime tensions seemed to exacerbate his prejudices. His postwar novels are calmer, more tolerant and less romantic than his first work, as his style shifted from Ralph CONNOR's romanticism towards F.P. GROVE's realism, this being most apparent in his seventh novel, Grain (1926). Although it retained some romantic elements, his fiction exemplified the tendency towards "prairie realism" in Canadian literature.

Custodial history

Scope and content

Typed letter(s) signed by the author, granting permission to reprint poem Kitchener and discussing promotion of Songs of the prairies.

Notes area

Physical condition

Immediate source of acquisition

Arrangement

Language of material

Script of material

Location of originals

Availability of other formats

Restrictions on access

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Finding aids

Associated materials

Related materials

Accruals

General note

Partial

Alternative identifier(s)

Standard number area

Standard number

Access points

Subject access points

Place access points

Name access points

Genre access points

Control area

Description record identifier

Institution identifier

Rules or conventions

Status

Revised

Level of detail

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Language of description

Script of description

Sources

Accession area

Related subjects

Related people and organizations

Related places

Related genres

Location

  • Folder: 2001, Box 1, File 2